Wildlife, including endangered species, flows through a bushmeat market in Kumasi, Ghana, despite a hunting ban. The extent and conservation implications of the trade, said to be worth £105 million yearly in Ghana alone, are under-documented and under-reported. Current data is hard to find, but according to one estimate Ghana's wildlife biomass has declined by 75% since the 1970s.
People eat bushmeat for a number of reasons, including culture and a perception that it is healthier. And in a world of hormone-pumped antibiotic-fed farm animals, that’s perhaps hard to argue with. But with wealthier urban consumers fuelling demand, compounding factors such as habitat loss, and little thought being given to sustainability, one wonders how much (more) will soon have been eaten to extinction.
False entries in a Forestry Commission officer‘s logbook.
False entries in a Forestry Commission officer‘s logbook.
A Forestry Commission inspector chatting with bushmeat traders while surrounded by illegal deliveries of bushbuck, duiker and wild pig.
A Forestry Commission inspector chatting with bushmeat traders while surrounded by illegal deliveries of bushbuck, duiker and wild pig.

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